People Share Their Terrible Vacation Break Up Stories

Vacation is a time to unwind and relax. Being in a new city or country helps us gain perspective and can provide us with new insight about our lives back home. If you have someone special in your life, naturally it makes sense to go on a trip together. You want to deepen your relationship and have an adventure, right? This makes sense in theory, but couples sometimes find that the stress of travel is too much for their relationship to handle. The big problem is, once you are out there you usually have to finish your trip together before you can go home and unpack the “baggage”. Here are 52 vacation break up stories that show just because you love someone doesn’t mean you can travel with them.


52. Talk About Fantastic Timing

I was 16 and totally head over heels for my best friend since I was 8. He felt the same way, we long-distance dated for about 8 months. Before going on a trip to Italy, I call him and he seems distant on the phone. I chalk it up to stress or whatever and go to Italy promising to bring him back something great. I spend the whole trip wearing the gaudy dolphin necklace he gave me and spent an insane amount of money on a Ferrari remote-controlled car at the Ferrari HQ. I come back from my trip, call his house, and his dad answers. I ask to speak to my boyfriend, and he says “oh, he told everyone you guys broke up before your trip.” I gave the car to my little cousin.

 

51. Talk About An Emotional Rollercoaster

My boyfriend and I were long distance. I paid for him to fly down and visit me for two weeks. On the second or third day of his visit, my grandfather passed away. I was an emotional wreck. The next day he broke up with me on account of me being an emotional rollercoaster, then got mad when I said he couldn’t stay with me the rest of the visit. He then claimed he didn’t mean what he’d said about breaking up, then broke up with me again as soon as he was back home.


50. A Little TOO Curious

I have two children from a previous marriage, and we have one child together. I went home (another country) to see my eldest son graduate. My spouse, who bitterly hated it when I traveled and he couldn’t go, urged me to “take some time, see your friends.” Historically it had been anger before I left, anger when I was gone, and anger when I got home. He had been unemployed for nine years and was totally dependent on me. He wanted for nothing: every new toy, new computer, new car, new laptop, and all the new games, which he spent hours mastering. It was a pleasant surprise to be offered a bit of time with no guilt. He seemed interested in my son’s graduation: the day, the time, and I honestly thought nothing of it. It felt good.

On the day my son graduated, as we were standing outside for the pictures, my ex texted me from 1,700 miles away: “I want a divorce.” I was a zombie. Posing for pictures, mentally re-arranging travel plans to be completed as soon as my son’s celebratory party was done. I return home and the house had been ransacked: furniture, books, etc., missing. It looked like a tornado had gone through the living